Motoz Tractionator GPS Tire Review

Hello 2018!

What better way to start off a new year than with a set of new motorcycle tires for the upcoming riding season?!

 

I bring you my latest semi long-term test review of the Motoz Tractionator GPS tires. I equipped these tires on my 2014 BMW R1200 GSA back in August, 2017 and set my sights on some curvy roads. My goal was to challenge these tires in wet/slick conditions and determine their cornering abilities. I packed my bags and headed north to Lorton, VA and started my way down through the Shenandoah National Park. I got exactly what I wished for because it rained non-stop for the next several days.

 

Besides the rain, the leaves were changing colors and falling off; thus, providing me with an even greater challenge of riding untested tires on curvy roads, in wet conditions, and also on a leafy surface!

Having had 30k miles of experience with the direct competitor (Heideanu K60 Scouts), I wanted to focus on identifying the riding characteristics of the Tractionator GPS tires in comparison. I have always heard rumors about the K60 Scouts being slippery as hell on wet roads and never thought much of it, as I drive all the time in torrential Florida rain and had never experienced an issue. It wasn’t until my recent trip to Alaska, riding two-up on a straight road to Kennicot, that I fishtailed and fully understood the slippery horror others using the K60 Scouts had experienced before me. With pure luck and cheeks puckered, I managed to keep us upright and push on.

With that experience in mind, I continued on to the Blue Ridge Parkway to further test the handling of the Tractionator GPS tires. Getting used to them and feeling more confident, I made my way down to the bottom of famous Tail of the Dragon. I started my first run moderately and pushed harder on the following runs.

Check out my YouTube video from Tail of the Dragon:

https://youtu.be/3xxA57izjBQ

The Tractionator GPS tires claim to be 50/50 with an option of the rear tire being reversed for even more traction off-road. I would rate them as a solid 60/40 road configured and a 50/50 off-road configured.

What I can tell you is that these tires perform well in all conditions with the possible exception of ice since I tend to stay away from frigid temps if I can help it. They are by no means a full road tire or hardcore motocross tire, but rather are a good all around adventure tire for those seeking the ability to jump on and off the road with confidence. I managed to rack up just under 4,000 miles and the Tractionator GPS tires show no signs of wearing out anytime soon. If I had a crystal ball, I would estimate these will last a total of 8-10k miles on the rear.

Price Comparison:

Motoz Tractionator GPS – Front $139; Rear $210

Heideanu K60 – Front $154-195; Rear $189-285

For years, consumers have had limited tire choices for the larger displacement motorcycles which offer both on-road and off-road manners. The Motoz Tractionator GPS tires are a win in my book and I will continue to use them for my long distance adventure travels.

For more product information, click the link below:

http://pacificpowersports.com/products/motoz-tires/

Till next time, ride safe and keep adventuring!


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Snugpak Gear Review

Is Snugpak the holy grail for compact camping gear?

 

From the tundra of the Arctic Circle to camping in your backyard, Snugpak has you covered with a wide selection of gear.

 

I brought the MML 3 Softie Smock and the Tactical 2 Sleeping Bag along on a recent adventure. The MML 3 Softie Smock is a pullover, insulated jacket, which is extremely compressible for convenient space saving during packing. The fabric is super comfy and kept me warm throughout my trip. It is rated from 0 celsius comfort to -5 celsius low. Thus, it keeps you warm in some of the coldest climates. While at Prudhoe Bay, I only needed to wear an under shirt and the MML 3 Softie Smock while exploring the Arctic Ocean. This created a perfect combo, along with my riding jacket for the outwear, for my trek to the far north.

MML 3 Softie Smock at the Arctic Ocean

The tactical series of sleeping bags gives you everything you need and nothing you don’t. I was on the quest to find the most compact, space saving sleeping bag which would still provide me with the low temperature rating needed for my trip. I found the cost to be reasonable when comparing it to other brands, which attempt to compete with its size and temperature rating, but cost significantly more.

Tactical 2

Compressed size

Something that I personally feel strongly about, and place my full support behind, is a company with traditional values and heritage. To my knowledge, Snugpak is one of the last companies of its kind which still engineers and produces several products at their vintage mill dating back to the 1800’s in West Yorkshire, North England. Because of this, the products come with reassurance that the price you are paying is supportive of workers being paid a fair wage to produce a quality product with pride instead of a bunch of machines doing the job.

So again I ask… is Snugpak the holy grail for compact camping gear? Why yes, yes it is.

 

To view the full US product line, click on the link below:

http://www.proforceequipment.com/product.php?brand=snugpak

Dalton Hwy

 


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KLIM TK1200 Karbon Modular Helmet

Hi there!

As Mrs. 2wheeladv, I am #blessed with the opportunity to travel the world two-up, and have also had the privilege to start testing out some gear of my own! What better time to do so than on the 2017 Arctic Circle or Bust Tour?

I traveled for a total of 2.5 weeks and spent 12ish days on the back of the Beemer. I took in the breathtaking sights, sounds, and smells of Alaska, The Yukon, British Columbia, Alberta, and Montana. It went from freezing cold rain to hotter than the Canadian wildfires, so I had a wide range of experiences.

 

Rock climbed to the top of a glacier and ticked off a few friends in the meantime? Check.

Rode the Denali Highway in all its dusty glory? Check.

Saw a deer saunter through our campground? Check.

(Deer said, “No pictures, please!”)

Tested out the new Klim TK1200? Double check.

Not gonna lie, it was a bit daunting to test out a new helmet on such a long journey, but it worked out swimmingly with zero regrets.

Pros: 

-Lightweight and did not get caught in the wind (thus, no sore neck). I did not experience wind turbulence as I have with other helmets.

-Great at temp control due to the easy to operate vent adjustments (kept cold air out and cool air flowing during hot days).

-Loved, loved, loved the transition lens (one less screen to have to finagle with and kept my fair skin protected from the sun, as well).

-Chin strap clasp was easy to hook and release in a jiffy, which was much more convenient for me when hopping on and off the bike to see the sights, as compared with the annoying traditional loop and lock strap on the Shoei and most other modular helmets which have cramped my style in the past.

-Quiet helmet when compared to my previous modular helmets.

-Reasonably priced at $599.99, especially considering all of the features that this helmet has to offer.

 

Cons (which were not really cons, but rather minor, personal preferences):

-Difficult for me to wear my cheap-o earplugs due to the snug fit around the ears/cheekbones when pulling the helmet over my head. It is unclear if the issue would have been improved had I brought along a pair of those fancy, schmancy custom ear plugs like the hubs wears.

-Fogging would have been a major, but fixable, issue in the cold rain if I had been driving (anti fog spray or pin lock would be needed, which I did not bring along on this trip).

Overall, it is a versatile helmet and is also good looking too. 😉

Till next time, ride safe!

With our new Colombian friend.


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